Connecting With Like-Minded Young People

Agriculture groups across America are inspiring and connecting our youth.

Navigating high school and college may be notoriously difficult times, especially in today’s world where controversial topics are constantly dividing young people. This divisiveness is often prevalent among young agriculturalists. False information spread about agriculture can be confusing and isolating to students who are from farming and ranching families, or are looking to pursue a career in the family business. The steady stream of “fake news” ultimately builds a wall between students and their peers who disagree with their perspective.

Thankfully, agriculture organizations across the United States have created a welcoming community for like-minded students who love agriculture. This has created a place where they can feel comfortable sharing their way of life and viewpoints. The most common of these organizations are Future Farmers of America (FFA) and 4-H. Both of these groups are nationwide and may be joined on local and/or national levels. In addition, they provide students with the ability to become a part of a larger agriculture community during high school and college. In some cases, even into future careers, access to a welcoming place with other young agriculturalists is critical for many of these students who have nowhere else to turn when they are ridiculed for their way of life.

FFA and 4-H are not alone. At many high schools and universities there are student clubs based on equestrian sports, showing livestock, horticulture, and breed-specific interests. These clubs all share one main goal: to create a space for students to meet with peers and mentors who share their passions and beliefs about American agriculture. Sadly, this view appears to be in short supply in today’s world.

The ability of students to join these clubs and organizations is imperative to the future of agriculture. The future of the agriculture community often starts with them. Both national and local organizations arm students with the confidence and backing to effectively promote the agriculture community and what is right. This is more important now than ever with the news media constantly spreading false information.

Not only will agricultural clubs and organizations give young people the confidence to stand up for what is right, they teach valuable life skills. One quick glance at the 4-H and FFA websites will tell you everything you need to know about the values that these organizations embody and what young people will gain from joining them. This includes exceptional leadership and communication skills. They also promote personal growth gained from being a part of a well-respected community of young people. There is truly no downside when joining other young people in becoming a part of the agriculture community.

Becoming Part of the Community

If you are a student who is feeling isolated by your way of life or interest in agriculture, and you want to connect with a greater community of agriculturalists, joining is easy. The first step you can take is to investigate your school organizations to see if there are any agricultural clubs offered. Many schools offer at least a small portion of academic clubs that involve some form of agriculture. If you would like to become even more involved in the community through groups like 4-H and FFA, both offer simple application instructions on their websites (linked below), making it easy for students to join local chapters. At Protect The Harvest, we believe young Americans need to be supported so they can become the future leaders and farmers of America. It is through them that we will continue to be a free and fed America.

Helpful Links:

How to Join Your Local FFA Chapter here.

How to Join Your Local 4H Club here.

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